How transparent are countries about their UNCAC implementation?

Last updated: 18 August 2022

The UNCAC Coalition, in collaboration with CSOs in over 30 countries (and counting), is using Freedom of Information (FOI) requests across the world to ask governments to release official UNCAC review documents. These contain crucial information about the country’s anti-corruption efforts, and stand to inform civil society advocacy on the topic.

Exercising the right to information also enables CSOs to hold their governments to account, and follow-up on country’s transparency commitments as enshrined in the UNCAC. How transparent is your country in terms of UNCAC implementation?

Access to Information Requests on UNCAC Reviews

The table displays the findings and results of the campaign, sharing the request letters, replies received from authorities and any of the official UNCAC documents disclosed via freedom of information (FOI) requests. Scroll down past the table for some tips to navigate through the findings.

  • To enlarge the findings for a single country, hover over the number in the first column of the table and click on the two small arrows to ‘expand record’.
  • To view a short description of what each column heading is referring to, hover over the small letter ‘i’ to the right of each heading.
  • To view a larger version of the entire table, scroll down to the very bottom and click ‘view larger version‘ in the bottom right corner.
  • To view a graphical representation of which countries have participated in this campaign so far, click on ‘Apps‘ at the top right corner of the table to display a clickable map tracker.
  • For a comprehensive ranking and better understanding of access to information legislation in your country (where applicable), check out the Global Right to Information Rating.

Campaign Highlights

Through the Access to Information Campaign and the efforts of CSOs, official UNCAC review documents have been released by:

  • Argentina, which released its Cycle 2 Self-Assessment Checklist;
  • Armenia, which released its Cycle 2 Self-Assessment Checklist;
  • Benin, which released its Self-Assessment Checklists and Full Country Reports for both Cycle 1 and Cycle 2 (NB: the latter are in still draft format, and have not been shared on the database because they are still working documents);
  • Bulgaria, which released its Cycle 1 Self-Assessment Checklist;
  • Croatia, which released its Cycle 2 Self-Assessment Checklist;
  • Czechia, which released its Self-Assessment Checklists for both Cycle 1 and Cycle 2;
  • Georgia, which released its Cycle 2 Self-Assessment Checklist;
  • Mexico, which released its Cycle 1 Self-Assessment Checklist;
  • Mongolia, which released its preliminary Country Reports for both Cycle 1 and Cycle 2;
  • North Macedonia, which released its Cycle 2 Self-Assessment Checklist;
  • Spain, which released its Cycle 1 Self-Assessment Checklist.

Updates to the table and campaign findings will be made on a quarterly basis.

What information is being requested? 

The UNCAC Coalition is coordinating an Access to Information Campaign in collaboration with civil society organizations (CSOs) across the globe to submit formal Freedom of Information requests to their respective governments and relevant authorities, appealing for the release of crucial UNCAC documents.

Through the campaign, civil society organizations have been requesting the following documents and information:

This campaign is an opportunity for CSOs to make their voices heard, to hold governments to account in terms of the fundamental right of access to information, and through the successful release of these documents, to obtain comprehensive information on governments’ reported actions to implement the Convention and to combat corruption.    


Do you have any questions, doubts or corrections? Would you like to participate in this campaign? Write to us at email hidden; JavaScript is required.

A global civil society network promoting the implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC)